Through video visitation service, Securus is helping to fight intramural prison crime

In the United States prison system, one of the most serious threats facing institutions is inmates who feel they have nothing to lose. Inmates who are sent to prison for long periods of time oftentimes develop a deep sense of ennui, which causes them to gradually lose hope and become dependent upon the carceral environment for their own sense of identity. It is this process of institutionalization that has long been the focal point of reforming inmates and allowing them to have a viable second chance at life upon their release.

 

One company, Securus Technologies, is helping to fight the institutionalization of inmates in a novel and high-tech way. Through its implementation of video visitation systems, Securus is allowing inmates to stay in almost constant contact with family members, giving them something to get out of bed for in the morning and a sense of lasting hope. Inmates that would have likely gone their entire sentence without seeing their close family members, including young children, are now able to talk with them on a daily basis, allowing for the maintenance of those crucial relationships with outside, law-abiding citizens that prevent inmates from becoming completely engulfed by the criminal milieu of the prison environment.

 

On top of this, Securus has been able to offer the service and incredibly low rates. On average, prisoners paid just $0.15 per minute to use Securus’ video visitation systems, a rate that is lower, historically speaking, the most inmates would have been paying for outgoing telephone calls on an old, analog line.

 

It is through innovations like these that Securus is doing a great deal to keep U.S. prisons safe for both inmates and the guards who keep the institutions running. Through its billion-dollar research and development projects, Securus continues to deliver high-tech and innovative products to one of the most challenging workplace environments in the country.

 

Julia Jackson a Wine Enthusiast

Julia Jackson is the daughter of Jess Jackson and Barbara Banke and was born in San Francisco California in the year 1988. Julia is the proprietor of Jacksons Family Wine business. Julia comes from a wine making family and developed interests in the business since her childhood. Julia started picking and sorting grapes at a very tender age. Julia while still at school during the summer holidays would work at several of their family wineries. It is here that she met a French speaking daughter of one of the employees whom she became friends with. The friendship culminated in a trip to Bordeaux France where Julia learned to speak French, fell in love with the French people culture and also learned the French winemaking style.

Julia attended Scripps College in Claremont, California and pursued a Bachelor of Arts degree in Studio Art from the year 2006 to 2010. In 2010 Julia went to Stanford Graduate School of Business where she was awarded a Certificate in General Management.

Julia is also a philanthropist and in 2014 founded the Cambria Seeds of Empowerment. Cambria Seeds of Empowerment is a program that celebrates great women in the society who have been able to overcome life hardships and is a source of inspiration to other women in the community. The inspiration behind the formation of Cambria Seeds of Empowerment was her mother who was her role model and the brains behind Jackson’s family wine company. The empowerment program awards $100,000 annually in the form of grants to charitable organizations that support the programs pillar of equality, community, and spirit.

View more: https://www.linkedin.com/in/julia-jackson-70662b87

Cardinale Intrada Sauvignon Blanc is one of the best brands that the family wine company produces and was served at a dinner in 2016 at the Weinstein Company’s extravagant pre-Oscar party. Other notable brands include the Cambria and the Julia’s Vineyard Pinot Noir which was named as the wine of the year in 2010 by wine Enthusiast.

Luiz Carlos Trabuco And Bradesco’s Comeback

When Luiz Carlos Trabuco became CEO of Bradesco, Brazil’s second largest bank, he took over at a time of uncertainty. Bradesco had fallen to second place, behind its most important competitor, Itau. Nonetheless, Trabuco had some big shoes to fill, as his predecessor, Márcio Cypriano, had succeeded in skyrocketing the bank’s market valuation from USD5 billion to a whopping USD30 billion. Bradesco is one of Brazil’s leading brand names, and when it comes to profits and performance, the expectations for the company are sky high.

Luiz Carlos Trabuco is a company man, who joined Bradesco just out of college as a clerk and kept getting promoted. Before being chosen as CEO by the board of directors, Trabuco was the head of Bradesco’s insurance division, which represent’s one of the company’s most crucial lines of business. In fact, the former CEO, Cypriano, had been preparing the way for Trabuco to succeed him from the beginning, which made the announcement of his selection somewhat surprising, as the company has had a tendency to go with unlikely candidates for the top job.

Luiz Carlos Trabuco inherited a company that was used to being on top, and so his first priority was figuring out the best way of staging a comeback. Early on, he said he would eschew gimmicks in favor of fundamental improvements that would strengthen the brand and generate new business. One of his first changes was slashing fees in order to improve the customer experience. The executive was also keen to change the culture of the company for the better. He began to promote managers who showed innovation and problem-solving skills. Trabuco even instituted brainstorming sessions in which each participant was responsible for contributing a meaningful idea that would help boost the bottom line.

Although Trabuco has spoken at length of emphasizing organic growth, the possibility of Bradesco purchasing a smaller bank had always been of interest. The problem was that when Trabuco became CEO in 2009, there were no interesting prospects, but all of that changed with the Bradesco’s recent acquisition of HSBC’s Brazilian business. The HSBC deal has put Bradesco back on top in a couple of key metrics, and has narrowed the overall gap between Brazil’s two major retail banks.

The deal should come as no surprise, since Bradesco has a long history of growing through consolidations. The bank is widely considered to be Latin America’s most valuable brand name, and the company is famous for a long list of firsts, including being the first bank in Latin America to provide ATM cards. Its rise as one of the country’s leading banks was made possible by its investment in the technology sector.

Luiz Carlos Trabuco has been at Bradesco for forty years, since he graduated from the University of Sao Paulo. Although it is clear that he knows his company very well, it remains to be seen whether Trabuco’s strategies and his acquisition of HSBC Brazil will be enough to overtake Itau and make Bradesco the market leader once again.